The trails

From April to December 1915, Anzac soldiers were part of an attempt by the Allies to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula so as to secure the important shipping lane - the Dardanelles Strait.

These five explorable trails tell the story:
Explore Gallipoli

Begin at the beach where Anzacs landed - and imagine their first harrowing day at Gallipoli.

Explore

Getting there

Location Collection:
Location Name: 
Anzac Cove
Lat: 
40.23923
Long: 
26.27684

Explore the defence line that the Anzacs held for two months – and understand the immense challenges they endured.

Explore

Getting there

Location Collection:
Location Name: 
Holding the Line
Lat: 
40.23027075500171
Long: 
26.287245142822258

Visit the ridge where New Zealanders tasted brief, exhilarating triumph, as the Allies launched a daring new offensive.

Explore

Getting there

Location Collection:
Location Name: 
Chunuk Bair
Lat: 
40.25183348554802
Long: 
26.282959946899382

Discover the south of Gallipoli, where the British – staging their primary attack – tried to push northwards, joined by Anzac troops.

Explore

Getting there

Location Collection:
Location Name: 
Cape Helles
Lat: 
40.1408323091416
Long: 
26.375662868652398

Tour sites that vividly tell the story of the Ottoman victory on Gallipoli – along with the Allies’ heartbreaking evacuation.

Explore

Getting there

Location Collection:
Location Name: 
The Defence
Lat: 
40.27272
Long: 
26.29299

Itineraries

The main sites for a trip to Gallipoli centre around Anzac Cove beach and the ridgeline above it. These are easily accessible by car from Eceabat, and there is plenty of parking at Anzac Cove.

Two-hour itinerary

Or on a bus trip without much time to yourself.

Group trips to Gallipoli usually stop at set locations where pivotal events in the Anzac story took place – Anzac Cove, Lone Pine, Johnston’s Jolly, Quinn’s Post and Chunuk Bair. For a specifically New Zealand perspective on Gallipoli, listen to the audio guide for each of these locations.

If you are driving yourself, visit and listen to the audio guide for one must-do stop on each of the three key trails:

Anzac Cove trail

Must-do: Ari Burnu – where the Anzacs landed on April 25 1915

Time: 30 minutes

Holding the Line trail

Must-do: Quinn’s Post – a notoriously dangerous post on the Anzac front line

Time: 30 minutes

Chunuk Bair trail

Must-do: Chunuk Bair – the site of a brief but important Anzac victory

Time: 30 minutes

Hidden Data

A
two-hour-itinerary
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Location Collection: 
Location Name: 
Ari Burnu
Lat: 
40.238659751395566
Long: 
26.276839999999993
Location Name: 
Quinn's Post
Lat: 
40.23800495990643
Long: 
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Location Name: 
Chunuk Bair
Lat: 
40.251565618179775
Long: 
26.308254031982415

One-day itinerary

Day trip

The Anzac area is a short driving loop. Drive to Anzac Cove and take the full audio tour for each of these trails:

Anzac Cove trail 

Time: 2 hours

Begin at the beach where Anzacs landed – and imagine their first harrowing day at Gallipoli.

Starting at Ari Burnu, walk or drive to all the stops on the trail.
 
Holding the Line trail

Time: 2 hours

Explore the defence line that the Anzacs held for two months – and understand the immense challenges they endured. 

Drive up and along all the stops from Lone Pine to the Nek.

Chunuk Bair trail

Time: 1 hour

Visit the ridge where New Zealanders tasted brief, exhilarating triumph, as the Allies launched a daring new offensive. 

Hear an overview of the offensive on the summit of Chunuk Bair, for more detail visit steps 5 and 7.

The drive back 

The Defence trail

Time: 2 hours

Drive back down to Anzac Cove and follow the trail around sites that vividly tell the story of the Ottoman victory on Gallipoli – along with the Allies’ heartbreaking evacuation.

Drive back past Hill 60 and visit the Turkish villages.

Breaking up the tour

There are several great places for lunch, chai and coffee on the route from Eceabat and also along the route that passes through the Turkish villages. There are museums along both routes as well.

Hidden Data

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Location Collection: 
Location Name: 
Anzac Cove
Lat: 
40.238659751395566
Long: 
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Location Name: 
Holding the line
Lat: 
40.23099403806091
Long: 
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Location Name: 
Chunuk Bair
Lat: 
40.251565618179775
Long: 
26.308254031982415
Location Name: 
The Defence
Lat: 
40.27599477588069
Long: 
26.286968021240227
Location Name: 
Büyükanafarta
Lat: 
40.281822691144576
Long: 
26.32924180969235
Location Name: 
Bigali
Lat: 
40.23623556792793
Long: 
26.359494953002923

Two-day itinerary

Day One

Follow the One-day itinerary.

Day Two

Option 1 - New Zealand Track to Chunuk Bair

Time: 3 hours

Retrace the exact steps of the Anzac soldiers who struggled up these slopes.

This track is steep and takes about two hours each way to walk. An alternative is to have someone drop you at the base and then meet them at the top.

Option 2 - Cape Helles driving trail

Time: 4 hours

Discover the south of Gallipoli, where the British – staging their primary attack – tried to push northwards, joined by Anzac troops.

From the Eceabat or Kilitbahir ferry, drive down the coast and explore the Cape Helles trail.

Alçitepe and Seddülbahir have great coffee, chai and lunch stops along the way.

Hidden Data

C
two-day-itinerary
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Location Collection: 
Location Name: 
Option 1 Start
Lat: 
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Long: 
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Location Name: 
Option 1 End
Lat: 
40.2522206149824
Long: 
26.308683185424798
Location Name: 
Option 2 Start
Lat: 
40.14162786013424
Long: 
26.374086170043938
Location Name: 
Option 2 End
Lat: 
40.085853248252484
Long: 
26.211437015380852

Three-day itinerary

Day One

Follow the one-day itinerary

Day Two

New Zealand Track to Chunuk Bair

Time: 2-3 hours

Retrace the exact steps of the Anzac soldiers who struggled up these slopes.

This track is steep and takes about two hours each way to walk. An alternative is to have someone drop you at the base and then meet them at the top.

Day Three

Cape Helles driving trail

Time: 2-3 hours

Discover the south of Gallipoli, where the British – staging their primary attack – tried to push northwards, joined by Anzac troops.

From the Eceabat or Kilitbahir ferry, drive down the coast and explore the Cape Helles trail.

Alçitepe and Seddülbahir have great coffee, chai and lunch stops along the way.

Hidden Data

D
three-day-itinerary
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Location Collection: 
Location Name: 
Day Two Start
Lat: 
40.252676428138294
Long: 
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Location Name: 
Day Two End
Lat: 
40.25215913307815
Long: 
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Location Name: 
Day Three Start
Lat: 
40.140380422672635
Long: 
26.371682910766594
Location Name: 
Day Three End
Lat: 
40.08695471638713
Long: 
26.214612750854485

Places of interest

A number of attractions will complement your exploration of the Gallipoli trails.
Museums

Museums

Atatürk Evi Museum

This was the headquarters of the Turkish hero Colonel Mustafa Kemal – later known as Atatürk. During the Gallipoli campaign he commanded the Ottoman Army’s 19th Division. He would eventually become founder and first President of the Republic of Turkey.

Hidden Data

B
40.23571207986979
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Location Collection: 
Location Name: 
Atatürk Evi Museum
Lat: 
40.27571207986979
Long: 
26.35976627563491

Gallipoli Simulation Centre

The centre contains 11 galleries, each equipped with high-tech, interactive simulation equipment, telling the Gallipoli campaign story from the points of view of both the Anzacs and the Turks.

Address: Çanakkale Destanı Tanıtım Merkezi
‪Kabatepe Mevki Eceabat Merkez, Eceabat, Gallipoli 17900 

Open 9.30am – 11am and 1.30pm – 5pm every day.

 

Hidden Data

A
40.2024896
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Kilitbahir Castle

Kilitbahir Castle is one of two fortresses on either side of the Dardanelles Strait. They were built in 1463 to control the strait at its narrowest point. 

You can walk around the outside, and a small museum on the site is sometimes open.  

Address: Kilitbahir Koyu, Eceabat.

Open 8am – 5pm Tuesday to Sunday in winter, and until 7.30pm in summer.

Hidden Data

C
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Naval Museum

Walk around the guns and cannons in the park outside, then explore the Gallipoli exhibits inside the museum.

Address: Cimenlik Sokak.

Open 9am – 5pm, every day except Monday and Thursday.

 

Hidden Data

D
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Other areas of interest

Other areas of interest

North Beach

This stretch of seashore between Ari Burnu and No. 2 Outpost is also known as Ocean Beach. It’s an important commemorative site and also offers panoramic views of the coast and the Aegean Sea.

Hidden Data

E
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Cemeteries & memorials

Cemeteries & memorials

Embarkation Pier Cemetery

This cemetery was named after a pier that was made for evacuating wounded from the Battle of Sari Bair. There are 944 Commonwealth servicemen buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time, however, note that wheelchair access is not possible.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

4
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Shell Green Cemetery

This cemetery was used from May to December 1915, largely by the Australian Light Horse and the 9th and 11th Infantry Battalions. After the Armistice, graves were brought in from battlefields and smaller cemeteries. There are 409 First World War burials here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time, however, wheelchair access is impossible. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

20
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Chunuk Bair Cemetery

This cemetery contains 632 Commonwealth burials. The Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial is situated within the cemetery and commemorates over 850 New Zealand soldiers who died in the Battle of Sari Bair and whose graves are not known. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. Wheelchair access to the memorial, but not the cemetery, is possible via main entrance.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

5
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Shrapnel Valley Cemetery

This cemetery was named after an essential road from the beach up to the Anzac front. There are 683 Commonwealth servicemen buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. Wheelchair access is impossible. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

21
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The Farm Cemetery

The Farm was a shepherd's hut on the western slopes of Chunuk Bair. The cemetery named after it was made by gathering in graves scattered around the Farm and from the slopes of Chunuk Bair and Hill Q. There are 652 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

6
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Lancashire Landing Cemetery

Most of this cemetery was made between the allied landing in April 1915 and the evacuation of the peninsula in January 1916. There are 1,237 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

22
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Hill 10 Cemetery

This cemetery is named after Hill 10, a low isolated mound to the north of the salt lake. There are 699 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

7
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Pink Farm Cemetery

Pink Farm was informally named for the red soil of the area. After the Battle of Krithia, three cemeteries grew up around it. These were combined after the Armistice into one cemetery, and graves from smaller cemeteries were also added. There are 602 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

23
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Hill 60 Cemetery

This cemetery sits among the trenches of the Hill 60 actions. There are 788 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. Within the cemetery is the Hill 60 (New Zealand) Memorial, one of four memorials erected to commemorate New Zealand soldiers who died on the Gallipoli peninsula and whose graves are not known. The cemetery is reached along an 800-metre track, which requires a 4-wheel drive in wet weather. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

8
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Redoubt Cemetery

This cemetery was named for a chain of forts made by the Ottomans across the southern end of the peninsula. There are 2,027 servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

24
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The Nek Cemetery

This cemetery was named after the Nek - a narrow track leading from Russell's Top to Baby 700 that was attacked but never held by the Allies. There are now 326 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. Wheelchair access is possible via the main entrance.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

9
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Skew Bridge Cemetery

This cemetery was named for a wood bridge along the the Krithia road. There are 607 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

25
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New Zealand No. 2 Outpost Cemetery

New Zealand No. 2 Outpost Cemetery was named in connection with the burials at No. 2 Outpost Cemetery, and is actually one long grave. There are 183 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. Wheelchair access is possible via the main entrance.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

10
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Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery

This cemetery was made after the Armistice, when graves were brought in from isolated sites and small battlefield burial grounds. There are 3,360 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated here. This cemetery also contains the Twelve Tree Copse (New Zealand) Memorial, one of four memorials erected to commemorate New Zealand soldiers who fell on the Gallipoli peninsula. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

A
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No. 2 Outpost Cemetery

This cemetery was named for No. 2 Outpost – the scene of heavy fighting at the end of May 1915. The cemetery was made during the Gallipoli campaign, and in it, 152 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War are buried or commemorated. The Cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. Wheelchair access is possible via the main entrance.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

11
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Walker’s Ridge Cemetery

This cemetery is named after the post of command of Brigadier-General Walker. It was held by a mixed force until 27 April, when the New Zealanders took it over. There are 92 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The Cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

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4th Battalion Parade Ground Cemetery

This cemetery was named for the 4th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, from New South Wales. There are 116 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

13
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Beach Cemetery 

Beach Cemetery was used from the day the Anzacs landed at Gallipoli, almost until their evacuation. There are 391 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited any time, however, it is on a steep slope, making wheelchair access impossible.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

14
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Courtney's & Steel's Post Cemetery

This cemetery was named after Courtney's Post and Steel’s Post, which – along with Quinn's Post – occupied critical positions above Anzac Cove. There are 225 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited any time. Wheelchair access is possible via the main entrance. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

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Johnston's Jolly Cemetery

This cemetery was named after a position reached by the 2nd Australian Infantry Brigade on 25 April 1915, but lost the next day. The cemetery was made after the Armistice. There are 181 Commonwealth servicemen buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

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7th Field Ambulance Cemetery

This cemetery was named for the 7th Australian Field Ambulance, which landed on Gallipoli in September 1915. There are 640 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

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Lone Pine Cemetery

This cemetery was named after a strategically important plateau that was held briefly by Australian forces, and then became a Turkish strong point. There are 1,167 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. Within the cemetery is also Lone Pine Memorial, commemorating many Australian and New Zealand servicemen who died in the Anzac area. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. Wheelchair access is possible via the main entrance.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

17
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Baby 700 Cemetery

This cemetery was named for a hill in the Sari Bair range, which the Allies tried to capture. There are 493 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time, however, note that wheelchair access is not possible. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

2
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Plugge's Plateau Cemetery 

This cemetery was named after the plateau where the commander of the Auckland Battalion, Colonel A. Plugge, had his headquarters. There are 21 First World War burials in this cemetery. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited any time, however, it is up a very steep track, making wheelchair access impossible.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

18
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Canterbury Cemetery

This is one of the central cemeteries in the Anzac area. There are 27 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried here. Twenty of the graves are of men of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles (mostly Canterbury Mounted Rifles). The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time.

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

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Quinn's Post Cemetery

This cemetery was named after Quinn's Post which was held by a number of different Australian and New Zealand units during the Gallipoli campaign and was constantly under attack. There are 473 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated here. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. 

For further information see Commonwealth War Graves Commission website

Hidden Data

19
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Explore the trails

Thinking about going?

If you are looking to visit Gallipoli, our travel tips and planning information will help you to have the best trip possible.

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