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Quinn’s Post

Quinn’s Post https://ngatapuwae.govt.nz/quinns-post Quinn’s Post was the post closest to the Ottoman frontline – just a few terrifying metres away. Ngā Tapuwae Trails https://ngatapuwae.govt.nz/sites/default/files/stop/media/02%20holding%20the%20line%402x.jpg

Quinn’s Post was the post closest to the Ottoman frontline – just a few terrifying metres away. 

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Quinn’s Post

During the Gallipoli campaign, most of this cemetery was no-man's-land. Where you are standing is close to the area of the New Zealand frontline trenches. The graves at the far end of the cemetery mark the Ottoman frontline trenches. If you were to look out here at no-man's-land in June 1915, there would be a tangle of barbed wire, chicken wire, burst sandbags and bodies. In fact, there were so many dead men between here and the Turks that maggots fell out of the trench walls. 

And often, when soldiers were digging forward towards the enemy, they would have to dig through bodies and seal them off with wood simply to get past. You can imagine the stench and the conditions that men lived with here at Quinn’s Post.

This particular spot was the most hated place at Quinn’s Post because this is where grenades were thrown. The Ottomans had a very good cricket-ball grenade. Until the very end of the campaign, the Anzacs only had a very lousy homemade grenade. These were made from empty jam tins at the beach. They were full of scrap, a bit of explosive, a detonator. Then the soldiers would hope to God that the grenades wouldn’t blow up in their hands as they turfed them into the enemy trench. 

At the same time, New Zealand and Australian tunnellers were digging underneath where you stand. The Ottoman tunnellers were digging as well, and there was an underground war going on. In fact, what you’re standing on is a ‘Swiss cheese’ full of tunnels that have been sealed off. 

In June 1915, when Quinn’s Post was taken over by the Wellington Infantry Battalion under Lieutenant-Colonel Malone, he transformed it into an impregnable bastion. He put up chicken-wire to stop the grenades bouncing down into the trenches and erected bomb-proof terraces for his men to live in. Malone insisted that every Turkish bullet, every Turkish grenade was met with at least twice the number from his own men. And in the end it was the Turk who feared coming into the line at Quinn’s Post. This became a very impressive stronghold, where both improvisation and professional skill turned it from the most dangerous post into one of the strongest.

When Malone took over Quinn’s Post, he set up a team of crack shots under Lieutenant Hami Grace, a young Māori officer who was part of the Wellington Infantry Battalion. Along with Jimmy Swan – an experienced deer stalker – they dominated. If there was a supply convoy coming up Monash Gully, the New Zealand and Australian snipers got busy and wiped out any Ottoman snipers – and guaranteed control over no-man’s-land. 

This was how New Zealand soldiers survived at Quinn’s Post.

How to get here

Getting there

Continue north along the road for a few hundred metres until you come to Quinn's Post Cemetery on your left.

Where to stand

Walk into Quinn's Post Cemetery, and go to the far left corner. Look across the cemetery toward the Turkish Memorial at Baby 700.

GPS
40°14'17"N
26°17'29"E
Decimal GPS
40.23817
26.29141
  • The view down Shrapnel Gully in 1915.
    The view down Shrapnel Gully in 1915.Credits

    Photographic postcard showing Shrapnel Gully, Gallipoli. Sir George Grey Special Collections, Auckland Libraries, 657-5

  • The terrace at Quinn's Post.
    The terrace at Quinn's Post.Credits

    Australian War Memorial A02014 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/A02014/

  •  Turkish trenches at Quinn's Post, looking through a bomb-proof screen. Wire, rifles, bomb tins, and debris of old attacks are scattered across no-mans-land.
     Turkish trenches at Quinn's Post, looking through a bomb-proof screen. Wire, rifles, bomb tins, and debris of old attacks are scattered across no-mans-land.Credits

    Australian War Memorial G01019 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/G01019/

  • A sniper using a periscope rifle at Quinn's Post. The framework of a wire netting bomb screen is showing.
    A sniper using a periscope rifle at Quinn's Post. The framework of a wire netting bomb screen is showing.Credits

    Australian War Memorial G01025 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/G01025/

  • A view through the bomb screens at Quinn's Post above Monash Gully across no-mans-land at the opposition, 1915.
    A view through the bomb screens at Quinn's Post above Monash Gully across no-mans-land at the opposition, 1915.Credits

    National Army Museum 1992.757

  • Terraces and shelters on the hillside. The New Zealand engineers and infantry under Colonel Malone made great improvements to Quinn's Post on Anzac. July 1915.
    Terraces and shelters on the hillside. The New Zealand engineers and infantry under Colonel Malone made great improvements to Quinn's Post on Anzac. July 1915.Credits

    Australian War Memorial G01024 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/G01024/

Stories & Insights

Fenwick kept diaries throughout the Gallipoli campaign, describing appalling sights in graphic detail.

Officers of Wellington Company share meal

The Anzacs were crammed together in trenches, many of them sick, living on food that was often barely edible - yet they coped.

Lieutenant A J Shout sniping with a periscope rifle, 1915.

From jam-tin bombs to periscope rifles, the Anzacs' inventiveness knew no bounds.

Malthus described the desperate and dangerous conditions at the notorious Quinn’s Post.

Clear-headed and disciplined, Malone was determined to improve living conditions for the men in the trenches. 

Major Kemal Ohri is led by the hand along the beach by two officers from Anzac headquarters as an envoy to negotiate an armistice to bury the dead.

After a horrific battle, rotting bodies lay everywhere in the no-man's land betwen trenches. Both sides agreed on a ceasefire to clean up.

An Australian soldier firing a Vickers .303 machine gun on Turkish positions. Lit by sunlight through the observation hole at right, the post one of many in the extensive array of tunnels connecting the Australian front line positions.

Both sides dug underground tunnels towards each other. It let them listen in to their enemy and lay hidden explosives.

Take the next trail

The next Ngā Tapuwae trail is Chunuk Bair. Proceed to No 2 Outpost.
Link to the first stop

Decimal GPS:
74.51234869995749
-76.32464468750004
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74.64527866338169
-89.31048453125004
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75.08725557577952
-101.21966421875004
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75.35894441520114
-102.09857046875004
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75.4684211203972
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Decimal GPS:
75.78788290096271
-117.06194937500004
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Decimal GPS:
75.45919210986763
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Decimal GPS:
75.51370929597266
-118.84173453125004
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Decimal GPS:
76.41021976105979
-111.54681265625004
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9

Stop Images

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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.23018
26.28766
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.23291
26.28721
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.23018
26.28766
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.23833
26.29188
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.23817
26.29141
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.24226
26.28995
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40.24133
26.28818
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.24168
26.28827
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.24289
26.29462