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New Zealand Memorial

New Zealand Memorial https://ngatapuwae.govt.nz/new-zealand-memorial-0 Stand on Gravenstafel ridge where the New Zealanders fought fiercely with the Germans. Ngā Tapuwae Trails https://ngatapuwae.govt.nz/sites/default/files/stop/media/Western%20Front-Passchendaele-Gravenstafel-Alexander%20Turnbull%20Library-12-012934-G.jpg

Stand on Gravenstafel ridge where the New Zealanders fought fiercely with the Germans.

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New Zealand Memorial

You are now standing at the New Zealand Memorial at Gravenstafel which records the New Zealand victory on the morning of 4 October 1917. This road junction was the Red Line - the first objective and you’re up on the Gravenstafel ridge that was also known as the Heights of Abraham, named by the Canadians who held it in 1915. In October 1917 it was the key to the German defensive line protecting the Passchendaele ridge which is down the road to your left and it was very strongly defended.

At the time, this was a lunar landscape, all the buildings had been knocked down or destroyed in the previous years' fighting and the cellars converted into strongly defended bunkers with walls a metre or so thick. These bunkers could withstand almost anything. They were often level with the ground and became homes for the German machine gun teams who would shelter there during barrages. Once British artillery fire lifted, the Germans would run out, hurriedly mount their machine guns in nearby craters around the bunker or on top of the bunker itself and pour fire upon the attacking British infantry.

If you look over at the crossroads, you can see the chimney stacks of that factory in the distance, ahead of that there’s a farm house complex in the area of Dochy Farm and on the right you can pick out the cross of remembrance of Dochy Farm Cemetery. In front of the cemetery was the road which was the startline for the New Zealand attack, and on that flank there - were the new boys of the 4th New Zealand Infantry Brigade. They’d formed in 1917 and this was their first and only big attack. On this side were the originals - the brigade that had fought on Gallipoli - the 1st New Zealand Brigade. Their job was to seize this ridge, where you stand, attacking bunker by bunker. Looking down, into the valley towards Dochy Farm, picture the New Zealanders advancing through this ground, among the German dead.

After reaching this position on the ridge the New Zealanders attacked Korek Farm - a formidable bunker complex in the ruins of the farms just to your right - using machine guns, mortars and, rifle grenades the 1st Wellingtons and the 3rd Otagos rushed these bunkers and threw grenades into the openings.

One Sergeant Paterson, of the Wellingtons, fought his way into Korek and found 30 or so dead and wounded inside. He also came across a German officer frantically trying to destroy important documents so they didn’t fall into British hands. The entire bunker caught fire and Paterson had to get out in a hurry. Korek burned like a furnace for the rest of the day, incinerating everyone inside it.

The next wave of New Zealanders pushed forward, over the ridge - where you stand and continued onto Waterloo Farm, near Berlin Wood which is further down the road behind you. Field Marshal Haig was elated with the success. General Russell, of the New Zealand Division, described the effort as: ‘not too bad’ - with over 1,000 wounded and some 400 New Zealand dead. The attack had not been as expensive as the 3,000 casualties from Messines. But the rain was about to fall, and the New Zealanders faced a difficult road ahead – the road - over that final ridge - to Passchendaele.

How to get here

Getting there

Continue down Zonnebekestraat. Turn right onto Roeselarestraat and continue until you reach the New Zealand Memorial at the crossroads.

Where to stand

Walk up to the New Zealand Memorial and turn around to face the crossroads.

GPS
50°53'26"N
2°58'45"E
Decimal GPS
50.8907
2.97919
  • The first German soldiers taken prisoner at 7.30am, 4 October, 1917.
    The first German soldiers taken prisoner at 7.30am, 4 October, 1917.Credits

    Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington. Ref: 1/2-012934-G. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22810631

  • A five-man German machine gun crew. All were killed at Zonnebeke, Belgium on 4th October, 1917.
    A five-man German machine gun crew. All were killed at Zonnebeke, Belgium on 4th October, 1917.Credits

    Australian War Memorial Museum C01089 (CC BY-NC 3.0 AU)

  • A German prisoner assists in carrying in a stretcher through the mud at Gravenstafel Ridge.
    A German prisoner assists in carrying in a stretcher through the mud at Gravenstafel Ridge.Credits

    Australian War Memorial Museum E00926 (CC BY-NC 3.0 AU)

  • The Allied soldiers in newly dug front line trenches near Flinte Farm, Broodseinde Ridge, Ypres, 5 October 1917.
    The Allied soldiers in newly dug front line trenches near Flinte Farm, Broodseinde Ridge, Ypres, 5 October 1917.Credits

    Australian War Memorial Museum E00948 (CC BY-NC 3.0 AU)

  • A YMCA stall supplies hot drinks to New Zealand walking wounded at St Jean. 5 October 1917.
    A YMCA stall supplies hot drinks to New Zealand walking wounded at St Jean. 5 October 1917.Credits

    © Imperial War Museums (Q 2973)

Stories & Insights

Armed with Lewis Guns and grenades, Ingram and his team faced German pillboxes and machine guns.

New Zealand Engineers resting in a large shell crater at Spree Farm, Ypres Salient, 12 October 1917.

Rain, mud and heavy artillery churned up the earth and made everything seem impossible, but the war continued.

Aerial view, somewhere over the Ypres Salient, showing the pock-marked earth, riddled with shell craters, and the remains of several trenches.

Messines was a staggering success for the Allies, yet Passchendaele was a total disaster. What went wrong?

Knight was newly promoted and led his men towards the enemy defences at Bellevue Spur.

Men at advanced dressing station, prepare a wounded soldier for the ambulance at Somme Farm, Ypres Salient.

At first, the failed attack was mildly described as 'another blow' - but New Zealand's darkest day had further and longer lasting consequences.

Hart was right in the thick of the action, facing formidable German defences at Passchendaele.

Useful resources for those looking for more information.

A selection of First World War vocabulary and common phrases.

Taking the Passchendaele trail

WARNING: Traffic can be busy so use caution at all times.

Get to Dochy Farm (the start of this trail) from Ieper

GPS: 50.881875, 2.971710 

Drive out of the Lille Gate (Rijselpoort) at the roundabout, take the third exit onto the N37. At the next roundabout, continue straight on the N37. At the roundabout (Hellfire Corner), take the third exit and stay on the N37.

Continue to follow the N37 for about 6km to Zonnebeke. At the roundabout, take the second exit onto Langemarkstraat. Continue onto Zonnebekestraat and park at Dochy Farm cemetery on your left.

Your stop

Enter the cemetery, turn right and walk to the corner. Face away from the cemetery, looking across the road.

Get to the trail overview Passchendaele Start Line from Ieper

Drive out of the Lille Gate (Rijselpoort) on Rijselstraat N336. At the roundabout, take the third exit onto the N37. At the next roundabout, continue straight on the N37. At the roundabout (Hellfire Corner), take the third exit and stay on the N37.

Continue to follow the N37 for about 6km to Zonnebeke. At the roundabout, take the second exit onto Langemarkstraat. Continue onto Zonnebekestraat. Turn right onto Roeselarestraat. Continue along Roeselarestraat, past the New Zealand Memorial on the left, onto ‘s Graventafelstraat (approximately 2km).  Park in the Cheese Factory (De Oude Kaasmakerij) car park.

Your stop

Walk to the left corner of the car park, stand in front of the Ngā Tapuwae sign facing away from the Cheese Factory/De Oude Kaasmakerij towards Passendale.

Plan your time

Allow for 2 to 4 hours to explore the complete Passchendaele trail.

If you’re short of time, simply visit stop 3: Passchendaele Start Line for an overview of the entire Passchendaele trail.

Nearby places of interest

While you’re here you can also visit the following places:

Saint-Charles de Potyze Cemetery
This French cemetery holds over 4,000 soldiers from nearby battlefields and the site itself was close to the frontline during the First World War.

Memorial Museum Passchendaele 1917 
Focusing on the Ypres Salient, this museum is a great introduction to Passchendaele.

Tyne Cot
Tyne Cot is the largest Commonwealth military cemetery in the world.

Location Collection: 
Location Name: 
Passchendaele
Lat: 
49.85784092594146
Long: 
-50.713947874999974
Lat Real Location: 
50.89307
Long Real Location: 
2.987224

Take the next trail

The next Ngā Tapuwae trail is Polygon Wood. Proceed to Buttes New British Cemetery.
Link to the first stop

Decimal GPS:
58.51905446777189
-64.37448140624997
Sequence:
1
Decimal GPS:
66.72043815745349
-84.27422796874993
Sequence:
2
Decimal GPS:
69.04523261367216
-77.14705334375003
Sequence:
3
Decimal GPS:
70.87108082572053
-102.54825796875008
Sequence:
4
Decimal GPS:
70.67047442190707
-35.803109937500096
Sequence:
5

Stop Images

Sequence:
1
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.88187
2.97171
Sequence:
2
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.8907
2.97919
Sequence:
3
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.89307
2.987224
Sequence:
4
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.90308
2.98641
Sequence:
5
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.88744
3.000601