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Johnston’s Jolly

Johnston’s Jolly https://ngatapuwae.govt.nz/johnstons-jolly Here you can explore some of the best-preserved trenches of the Anzac frontline. Ngā Tapuwae Trails https://ngatapuwae.govt.nz/sites/default/files/stop/media/02%20holding%20the%20line%402x.jpg

Here you can explore some of the best-preserved trenches of the Anzac frontline.

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Johnston’s Jolly 

You are immediately north of Lone Pine and the Lone Pine Cemetery. This area has some of the best-preserved trenches of the Anzac frontline. It gives you a feel for what it must have been like at Gallipoli in the period from April through to December 1915. 

The trenches were built so that you would have one man for every metre of trench. So if you were standing in a trench 10 to 12 metres long, that would be for a section of 10 to 12 men, and they would live here for up to eight days, then they would rotate with another section.

Half the battalion would be in the front trench – that’s about 400 men. They did everything here – they ate, slept, shat. That was their world. 

The Turkish troops opposite did the same. In fact this wasn’t a bad piece of ground because the Ottoman line here was quite some distance back, unlike Quinn’s Post where it was only 5 metres away. Here the two sides were 50–100 metres apart.

The Ottomans had been masters of siege warfare and fortification for centuries and had recently fought in the Balkans – so their defences were very good.

The trenches were not long and straight, but zig-zagged. This meant that the soldiers could defend themselves against the enemy firing down the trench, and they had cover from an artillery shell. 

Everyone made trenches the same way and perhaps the only difference with the trenches was the materials used. For overhead cover, the Anzacs used corrugated iron placed across the trench and covered with earth, whereas the Ottomans tended to use timber about the size of railway sleepers.

Conditions in these trenches were terrible. Men were in constant danger of being killed, they longed for the chance of joining a fatigue party down to the beach where they could get a sea bathe. They would go through the seams of their shirts and shorts and use a candle to kill the lice. They were unconsciously scratching all the time – they called it knitting. 

They lived on bully-beef and biscuits. There were often no fresh vegetables, and rarely fresh bread. Almost everyone suffered dysentery, and trooped backwards and forwards to the latrines. Everyone stank. A fit man was one who could stand in a trench and hold a rifle – and these were the guys who on 6 August got ready for the big attack on Chunuk Bair. 

How to get here

Getting there

From Lone Pine Cemetery continue north along the same road you took to get to Lone Pine Cemetery. After around 300 metres you come to Johnston's Jolly Cemetery on the right.

Where to stand

Walk across the road from the cemetery into the pine trees, and stand in the remnants of the Anzac trenches. Face Johnston’s Jolly Cemetery.

GPS
40°13'58"N
26°17'13"E
Decimal GPS
40.23291
26.28721
  • Australian troops relax inside a captured Turkish trench at Lone Pine. The headcover of this trench has been broken through by shelling.
    Australian troops relax inside a captured Turkish trench at Lone Pine. The headcover of this trench has been broken through by shelling.Credits

    Australian War Memorial G01126 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/G01126/

  • A shell bursting in Turkish Army positions on Johnston's Jolly, 1915.
    A shell bursting in Turkish Army positions on Johnston's Jolly, 1915.Credits

    Australian War Memorial H14016 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/H14016/

  • View along the inside of trenches on Russell's Top.
    View along the inside of trenches on Russell's Top.Credits

    View along trenches, Russell's Top, Gallipoli, Turkey. Powles family :Photographs. Ref: PA1-o-811-25-1. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23192103

  • Men sleeping in a frontline trench.
    Men sleeping in a frontline trench.Credits

    Asleep in a fire trench. National Army Museum, NZ 1991.585

  • An aerial view showing trenches at Lone Pine, Johnston's Jolly, the Pimple and Daisy Patch, June 1915.
    An aerial view showing trenches at Lone Pine, Johnston's Jolly, the Pimple and Daisy Patch, June 1915.Credits

    Australian War Memorial A02102 http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/A02102/

Stories & Insights

Fenwick kept diaries throughout the Gallipoli campaign, describing appalling sights in graphic detail.

Officers of Wellington Company share meal

The Anzacs were crammed together in trenches, many of them sick, living on food that was often barely edible - yet they coped.

Lieutenant A J Shout sniping with a periscope rifle, 1915.

From jam-tin bombs to periscope rifles, the Anzacs' inventiveness knew no bounds.

Malthus described the desperate and dangerous conditions at the notorious Quinn’s Post.

Clear-headed and disciplined, Malone was determined to improve living conditions for the men in the trenches. 

Major Kemal Ohri is led by the hand along the beach by two officers from Anzac headquarters as an envoy to negotiate an armistice to bury the dead.

After a horrific battle, rotting bodies lay everywhere in the no-man's land betwen trenches. Both sides agreed on a ceasefire to clean up.

An Australian soldier firing a Vickers .303 machine gun on Turkish positions. Lit by sunlight through the observation hole at right, the post one of many in the extensive array of tunnels connecting the Australian front line positions.

Both sides dug underground tunnels towards each other. It let them listen in to their enemy and lay hidden explosives.

Take the next trail

The next Ngā Tapuwae trail is Chunuk Bair. Proceed to No 2 Outpost.
Link to the first stop

Decimal GPS:
74.51234869995749
-76.32464468750004
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Decimal GPS:
74.64527866338169
-89.31048453125004
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Decimal GPS:
75.08725557577952
-101.21966421875004
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Decimal GPS:
75.35894441520114
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Decimal GPS:
75.4684211203972
-103.46087515625004
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Decimal GPS:
75.78788290096271
-117.06194937500004
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Decimal GPS:
75.45919210986763
-117.63323843750004
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Decimal GPS:
75.51370929597266
-118.84173453125004
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8
Decimal GPS:
76.41021976105979
-111.54681265625004
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9

Stop Images

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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.23018
26.28766
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.23291
26.28721
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40.23018
26.28766
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.23833
26.29188
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40.23817
26.29141
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.24226
26.28995
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.24133
26.28818
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.24168
26.28827
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Decimal GPS Real Location:
40.24289
26.29462