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Tyne Cot

Tyne Cot https://ngatapuwae.govt.nz/tyne-cot There are over 1200 names here, representing every town and district in New Zealand. Ngā Tapuwae Trails https://ngatapuwae.govt.nz/sites/default/files/stop/media/Western%20Front-Passchendaele-Tyne%20Cot-National%20Army%20Museum-NAM%201401.jpg

There are over 1200 names here, representing every town and district in New Zealand.

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Tyne Cot

You are now at the New Zealand Memorial to the Missing at Tyne Cot. As you can see it’s a distinctive enclosure, in the memorial wall. There are almost 1,200 names here, representing where men enlisted in every town and district in New Zealand. Over the past 30 years, 13 of these New Zealanders have been found, identified and buried, and this continues to happen.

The names on Tyne Cot include three brothers from Takaka - Leonard, Edwin and Leslie Newlove - all privates, who were all killed within eight days of each other in the two October attacks at Passchendaele. They were aged 40, 32, and 22 respectively. There are also at least five pairs of brothers on the memorial; Carmody, Hight, Leslie, McIlroy, and O’Gorman - and all but one of these men were killed on 12 October. Brothers, sons, cousins, farmers, teachers, university graduates - they all fell in Belgium during October 1917. These attacks once held the promise, certainly to Haig and his Generals, of an actual breakthrough - ending years of stalemate. This optimism disappeared with the failed assaults on 9 and 12 October. The cost of that failure can be read on these walls.

Walk among these headstones. At Tyne Cot, there are almost 12,000 of them. 70 percent are unidentified, and you can see many silver ferns among them. New Zealand paid dearly for Haig’s determination to push on. For the men who survived, it was to be a bleak winter here in the salient, occupying the ground - where we stand. Our Divisional Commander, General Russell, now faced the difficult task of rebuilding both the physical strength and the morale of his New Zealanders in order to face the struggle that would come in 1918.

How to get here

Getting there

Go back the way you came until you come to 's Graventafelstraat (the road that the Cheese Factory is on). Turn left and continue for about 400 metres.

Turn right on to Tynecotstraat and continue for about 12-1400 metres until you come to Tyne Cot Cemetery on your left.

Where to stand

Enter the cemetery, walk to the memorial wall at the far end and stand at the New Zealand Memorial to the Missing.

GPS
50°53'14"N
3°0'2"E
Decimal GPS
50.88744
3.000601
  • An aerial photograph showing the remains of the Menin Road after the preparatory bombardment during the battle for Passchendaele, 1917.
    An aerial photograph showing the remains of the Menin Road after the preparatory bombardment during the battle for Passchendaele, 1917.Credits

    National Army Museum, NZ. Accession No. 1990.312

  • German prisoners carrying wounded at Spice Farm on the Ypres Salient, 4 October 1917
    German prisoners carrying wounded at Spice Farm on the Ypres Salient, 4 October 1917Credits

    Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington. Ref: 1/2-012932-G. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22864977

  • A party of English soldiers burying men who were killed in the failed attack on Passchendaele Ridge, 12 October 1917.
    A party of English soldiers burying men who were killed in the failed attack on Passchendaele Ridge, 12 October 1917.Credits

    Australian War Memorial E01042 (CC BY-NC 3.0 AU)

  • Australian infantry at bunker-turned-First Aid Post near Zonnebeke Railway Station.
    Australian infantry at bunker-turned-First Aid Post near Zonnebeke Railway Station. Credits

    Australian War Memorial E01202B (CC BY-NC 3.0 AU)

  • Graves of New Zealanders beside Gravenstafel Road. February 1918.
    Graves of New Zealanders beside Gravenstafel Road. February 1918.Credits

    © Imperial War Museums (Q 10500)

Stories & Insights

Armed with Lewis Guns and grenades, Ingram and his team faced German pillboxes and machine guns.

New Zealand Engineers resting in a large shell crater at Spree Farm, Ypres Salient, 12 October 1917.

Rain, mud and heavy artillery churned up the earth and made everything seem impossible, but the war continued.

Aerial view, somewhere over the Ypres Salient, showing the pock-marked earth, riddled with shell craters, and the remains of several trenches.

Messines was a staggering success for the Allies, yet Passchendaele was a total disaster. What went wrong?

Knight was newly promoted and led his men towards the enemy defences at Bellevue Spur.

Men at advanced dressing station, prepare a wounded soldier for the ambulance at Somme Farm, Ypres Salient.

At first, the failed attack was mildly described as 'another blow' - but New Zealand's darkest day had further and longer lasting consequences.

Hart was right in the thick of the action, facing formidable German defences at Passchendaele.

Useful resources for those looking for more information.

A selection of First World War vocabulary and common phrases.

Take the next trail

The next Ngā Tapuwae trail is Polygon Wood. Proceed to Buttes New British Cemetery.
Link to the first stop

Decimal GPS:
58.51905446777189
-64.37448140624997
Sequence:
1
Decimal GPS:
66.72043815745349
-84.27422796874993
Sequence:
2
Decimal GPS:
69.04523261367216
-77.14705334375003
Sequence:
3
Decimal GPS:
70.87108082572053
-102.54825796875008
Sequence:
4
Decimal GPS:
70.67047442190707
-35.803109937500096
Sequence:
5

Stop Images

Sequence:
1
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.88187
2.97171
Sequence:
2
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.8907
2.97919
Sequence:
3
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.89307
2.987224
Sequence:
4
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.90308
2.98641
Sequence:
5
Decimal GPS Real Location:
50.88744
3.000601